The Garden Share Collective: Springtime

It is now officially spring here in Australia. The weather is getting warm enough that I don’t need to wear a jumper everytime I step outside and my skin can finally taste the warm tingle of sunshine.

That also means our balcony garden is in desperate need of an overhaul. My tomatoes and potatoes are well and truly over it, so they will need to come out.

My lettuce is still going strong, though I wonder for how much longer – I expect they will start bolting on me with all this hot sunshine.

The Garden Share Collective

The Garden Share Collective

The Garden Share Collective

The Garden Share CollectiveThe two parsley seedlings the mother-in-law gifted are surprisingly still alive and seem to be growing slowly. They are still too small for harvesting, but it shouldn’t be too long before I can add them to cooking.

The Garden Share CollectiveMy chilli has also provided its first chilli crop of the year. It isn’t as spicy as I’d hope, but I do have several seeds from spicier varieties I’ve been meaning to plant. Perhaps I’ll get to them this year.

The Garden Share Collective

A trough of broccoli have succumbed to mealy bugs (lovingly tended to by black ants), so they will have to go. I have already started a seed tray of mizuna and tatsoi designated to go into that trough. Fingers crossed there’ll be enough time between for the mealy bugs to clear the area.

The Garden Share Collective

The beetroots are chugging along nicely as well. I think I can just make out the beginnings of beetroots beneath, but I am still harvesting their leaves for salad. They also seem to have no issues growing alongside some renegade alyssum. I have a funny feeling I will never be rid of these groundcover flowers, as they are prolific seed producers. I just wish there weren’t so many white ones.

The Garden Share Collective

 

TheGardenShareCollective150pixThis blogpost is part of the Garden Share Collective, a group of bloggers who share their vegetable patches, container gardens and the herbs they grow on their window sills.