Sushi and Oden at Nigi Nigi, Brisbane

Brisbane city workers love their sushi rolls. Sushi establishments pop up on just about every street corner and come lunchtime, every man/woman would be lining up to grab a quick and relatively healthy lunch of nori-wrapped rice stuffed with any variety of fillings.

Not all sushi roll eateries are created equal and it shows. Some places have employed crowd control staff, others are ghost towns. Ask any city worker and don’t be surprised World War III breaks out over which is the best sushi roll joint.

For those with a bit more space than a closet, their menu offerings would be more than just a dozen sushi roll flavours. In the case of Nigi Nigi, they advertise two selling points:

  1. Nigi Nigi only uses fresh, not frozen, salmon.
  2. Besides sushi and typical Japanese fare, such as udon, Nigi Nigi also offer onigiri

This winter, they have included oden to their menu, which is really comforting for those who want a snack to nibble and slurp the hot broth from a paper cup enroute to catch a bus/train home. It’s also cheap, with sticks starting at 99 cents.

Their oden menu includes items such as a variety of vegetables ($0.99), fish cake ($1.20), mushroom-stuffed fish cake ($1.20), fried fish balls ($1.50) and fortune money bags ($2.20).

Most of their rolls are fat and the fillings fairly generous, but this is reflected in their prices. There are cheaper sushi roll places in the city, but Nigi Nigi is on prime real estate and can cater very well to the Central Station bound crowds.

Their salmon sushi rolls are not bad, but I recently tried their crab croquette sushi roll on a whim and it was awful. The crab croquette lacked any flavour and was so mushy, the texture was almost akin to being slimy. The nori was also very greasy, so avoid. Stick to their tuna or salmon type fillings and you should be alright.

 

Nigi Nigi on Urbanspoon

About Melissa Loh

Melissa likes many things other people might find a little strange. She blogs to get her love for creative expression out of her system, and spends the rest of her time either at work facilitating connections or in the kitchen monitoring chemical reactions that result in yummeh-ness. Read more about her here.